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Week 7 – CSS continued

Week 7 CSS Assignment download.

Your HTML files: HTML Files(in case you do not have yours in class today)

Examples from class today: CSS Examples

Week 6 – CSS

Week 6 CSS Assignment download.

Your HTML files: HTML Files(in case you do not have yours in class today)

Examples from class today: CSS Examples

Week 5 – Presentations

Today is scheduled for student presentations.

Near the end of class, there will be time for any questions regarding the web images project.

Week 4 – Web Images

Assignment – Web Images

Downloads
Large Photo
Profile Picture

Week 3 – HTML Structure

Download the first assignment here:Assignment 1

Download the presentation assignment here:Presentation

Week 2 – Social Media

Assignment: Social Media

Lecture:

Presentation:

Week One – Introductions

This week we will be going over the basics of the course.

Course Outline

Slides:

Course Outline

Download the course outline here:

AHSS 30805 – Web Design

Week 10: Social Media and Nonprofit Organizations

Each week a question is asked to the students of Digital Media in Practice – A course in the Ryerson MBA program.  The question relates to assigned readings and focuses on different aspects of digital media.

This week we reviewed Building the Charity Brand Community, Seth Godin on the tribes we lead, and Clay Shirky: How social media can make history.

What is a brand community? What are tribes? How can not-for-profit organizations use web 2.0 social media tools to build brand communities?
Essentially, a brand community is a group of individuals who rally around a concept, organization, or company.  Hassay and Poloza refer to brand communities as “groups of people with feelings of shared well-being, shared risks, common interests and common concerns centered on the consumption of a common object”, which is just a convoluted  way of identifying a group of people who like the same products.  A great example they use is the tribe or brand community that surrounds Harley Davidson.  Not only is this such a successful brand that it is not uncommon for people to tattoo the logo on their bodies, but it brings people together to share something they enjoy doing.  Harley owners are friends with other people who ride Harleys.

Not for profit organizations can use web 2.0 to build brand communities by allowing people who already have an interest in their brand to meet each other.  Seth Godin talks about how the web has created more silos (in a positive way) in that there is something for everyone.  If there is something that you are interested in, somewhere on the internet there is probably already a group of individuals who have put time and effort creating a community around that interest – and they would be more than happy to include you.  Not for profits can leverage this by tapping into those interested individuals and inviting them to be part of a larger group.  Seth Godin also speaks about finding people who are already interested and embracing them rather than trying to change the mind of an uninterested individual.
According to the assigned readings and short videos, what other benefits are there to not-for-profit organizations that choose to use social media?

A significant benefit that not for profits have is that they often succeed because they are honestly championing a cause.  This fits well with the motivations of people online since people feel that they can do a little bit of good without a significant contribution – like sharing information with someone in their network who would benefit from it.  Not for profits have the potential to encourage a very large audience to each make small contributions, which can be a winning combination online.

Week 9: Social Media Technology and Government

Each week a question is asked to the students of Digital Media in Practice – A course in the Ryerson MBA program.  The question relates to assigned readings and focuses on different aspects of digital media.

This week we reviewed Citizen Involvement in the Digital Age and Q&A with Rory Sutherland: An advertarian’s take on the world.
Are social technologies creating a shift towards a better functioning model of democratic involvement? Or is this just an illusion?

This is a wonderfully optimistic idea, but technology alone will not shift democratic involvement. Governments need to have an online arena to interact with constituents, but expecting technology to solve community involvement is unrealistic. While there are obvious benefits to using digital media in government, there are two major areas that I have concerns with.

1. Exclusion of Certain Groups
Moving online to interact with the general population is meant to widen the audience and have meaningful conversation with a variety of citizens. If relied on too heavily however, the exact opposite can happen. An online web forum, or public profile on social media are great tools for citizens who already use those tools, but totally shuns the individuals who are not in those spaces. Quite often the people who are most likely to interact online are not representative of the entire population. This can become dangerous especially when a specific political issue could benefit from consulting a group who is not involved in that online space. For example, it would be a poor decision to use Facebook to consult the public on pension reform.

2. Unbalanced Voices
The other danger about online public consultation is ensuring that the voices are actually representative of the larger group. Online it is easy to make it seem that your opinion is shared by hundreds or thousands of other people just by screaming loud enough. (I know lobbyists have been doing this since the beginning of time, but it is even more pronnounced online).

According to the articles, how can governments best leverage web 2.0 technologies to meet the needs of their communities?

The main concept that I took from
Citizen Involvement in the Digital Age by Dan Bevarly and Jeffery G. Ulm is that it is important to build public dialouge in any way possible – and online is a great way of doing that. The web allows a large part of the population (but not everyone) to contribute to public debate in a way that is not ownerous – at least when compared to attending a town hall meeting.

Rory Sutherland spoke about how online interactions can bring out the honesty in people because of their anonimity. This stood out for me and I think this concept could be very useful when governments are looking for honest, clear feedback about programs or initiatives.